Abstract Art and Antiques: How I Style My Home

Abstract Art and Antiques: How I Style My Home

Christine Trant
3 minute read

My husband and I purchased our first home in November of last year and have slowly been decorating it with abstract art and antiques. Take a step inside my personal style to see how you can seamlessly blend abstract art into your own Grandmillennial, traditional, transitional, or eclectic home.

Three pieces of abstract art on top of a credenza next to an antique chinoiserie lamp

As an artist, I have a natural inclination toward colors of all hues. When it comes to creating a new collection or decorating my home, I have to reign in that "yes to EVERYTHING" feeling and give it a direction to focus in. 

I would describe my interior design style as Grandmillennial meets eclectic—I love colorful, traditional decor and interesting details. 

Christine Dore Trant hanging abstract art in antique home with yellow lab Daisy

My home was built in 1810. My husband and I are working to preserve it and bring it into the 21st century so I am always looking for fun, creative ways to blend my abstract art with my favorite antiques! 

We are still very much in the middle of the process of decorating our home (we have some big renovations planned!), so I am taking my time selecting both artworks and antique pieces. 

Designing a Cohesive Home

While I shop, I keep an eye out for blue hues, copper accents, and warm woods—these elements fit our own personal style and will help make our home feel cohesive, no matter what room you're in. 

Styled abstract art and antiques on a mantle

This spot (above) on our dining room mantle is a great example: I've placed dark blue antique books, a copper unicorn figure, and two abstract pieces that have shades of blue in them on a warm wood mantle in front of a light blue damask wallpaper. 

Finding a common element—in this case, shades of blue—ties the space together. The abstract art helps the room to not feel too stuffy and the antique accents help the room to not feel too trendy. 

I created a similar vignette in our living room by styling a classic chinoiserie lamp with pieces from my New England Coastal Collection.

Collage of Christine Dore Trant's abstract art and Chinoiserie lamp

The shades of blue here work to make the pieces feel cohesive and a natural fit for the space. 

The Grandmillennial Twist on Traditional Decor

Anyone who loves antique and thrift hunting like I do has a sweet spot for traditional decor. While I swoon over traditional interior design staples like ornate frames, gilded mirrors, and a chintz curtain, my favorite style (for home decor or personal style) is the fairly-newly coined "Grandmillennial" style.

Grandmillennial (the mash-up of "grandma" and "millennial") refers to modern design mixed with antique elements and pops of color popular among people my age (*ahem* those of us born between the early 1980s and mid-1990s). 

What I love about Grandmillennial design is that it takes the timeless elements of traditional decor (or preppy style) and adds an element of fun: say an upholstered chair in a fresh color, a cheeky print, or with a fun trim. 

Abstract art is the perfect addition to any grandmillennial home—it adds a pop of colorful personality to rooms that might otherwise feel stuffy if buried in only realism art. 

I will keep you posted as I continue to decorate my new (antique) home! 

In the meantime, here are some perfect pieces to add to your home:

Tacking Gracefully

Tacking Gracefully

$450.00

20 x 20 inches. Framed. Acrylic on canvas. Part of the New England Coastal Collection, this piece is inspired by the classic blue, white, and neutral details found throughout the seaside towns and beaches of Southern Maine and Massachusetts. This… Read More

Out of the Deep

Out of the Deep

$340.00

12 x 12 inches. Framed. Acrylic on canvas. Part of the New England Coastal Collection, this piece is inspired by the classic blue, white, and neutral details found throughout the seaside towns and beaches of Southern Maine and Massachusetts. This… Read More

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